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Why Buy From us?

These are Reviews on Pricegrabber and Ebayfor Mgtape

http://reviews.pricegrabber.com/mgtape/u/1054194/

http://myworld.ebay.com/storagespecialists

Mgtape is in the business of data protection dedicated to providing our customers with the best service possible! We will continue to strive to make Mgtape your first choice for the best products, lightning fast shipping, and superior customer service. We've partnered with world leaders in technology and security to provide you with an easy to use, fully interactive and secure on-line shopping experience.

We understand that you want to be part of the process throughout the order and delivery of your order. We always strive to provide you the best shopping experience possible. You will know the status of your order every step of the way – in real-time. We believe that it is important for us and you to know your order status from the moment your credit card is submitted for authorization and verification, to the arrival of your product at your doorstep.

Confirmation of your order email: Thank you for placing your order. Your order was received successfully and is presently being verified. Please note: your order is not charged until it is shipped. At this point you will be assigned an order number and you can verify your order via the email we sent to the supplied email address.

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Security (Protecting Customer Information): This site has stringent security measures in place to protect the loss, misuse and alteration of the information under our control.we are pci DSS, What is PCI? A: The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a set of requirements designed to ensure that ALL companies that process, store or transmit credit card information maintain a secure environment. Essentially any merchant that has a Merchant ID (MID). The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council (PCI SSC) was launched on September 7, 2006 to manage the ongoing evolution of the Payment Card Industry (PCI) security standards with focus on improving payment account security throughout the transaction process. The PCI DSS is administered and managed by the PCI SSC (www.pcisecuritystandards.org), an independent body that was created by the major payment card brands (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover and JCB.). It is important to note, the payment brands and acquirers are responsible for enforcing compliance, not the PCI council. A copy of the PCI DSS is Certificates available

Disclosing Information: Mgtape.com respects your privacy. Mgtape.com does not sell, trade, or rent your personal information. Mgatep.com may release account information when we believe, in good faith, that such release is reasonably necessary to (i) comply with law, (ii) enforce or apply the terms of any of our user agreements or (iii) protect the rights, property or safety of Mgtape.com, our users, or others.

Credit Card Fraud Protection: Mgtape.com employs various credit card fraud prevention services, provided by our online merchant processor, in order to insure purchases made from Mgtape.com are not fraudulent. When you transmit credit card information to complete a purchase or verify data, we always transmit that credit card number in an encrypted format (SSL).

About Magnetic tape data storage

Magnetic tape has been used for data storage for over 50 years. In this time, many advances in tape formulation, packaging, and data density have been made. Modern magnetic tape is most commonly packaged in cartridges and cassettes. The device that performs actual writing or reading of data is a tape drive. Autoloaders and tape libraries are frequently used to automate cartridge handling.

When storing large amounts of data, tape can be substantially less expensive than disk or other data storage options. Tape storage has always been used with large computer systems. Modern usage is primarily as a high capacity medium for backups and archives. As of 2008, the highest capacity tape cartridges (Sun StorageTek T10000B, IBM TS1130) can store 1 TB of data without using compression.

Tape width

Medium width is the primary classification criterion for tape technologies. Half inch has historically been the most common width of tape for high capacity data storage. Many other sizes exist and most were developed to either have smaller packaging or higher capacity.

 Recording method

Linear

Recording method is also an important way to classify tape technologies, generally falling into two categories:

Linear

The linear method arranges data in long parallel tracks that span the length of the tape. Multiple tape heads simultaneously write parallel tape tracks on a single medium. This method was used in early tape drives. It is the simplest recording method, but has the lowest data density.

Linear serpentine

A variation on linear technology is linear serpentine recording, which uses more tracks than tape heads. Each head still writes one track at a time. After making a pass over the whole length of the tape, all heads shift slightly and make another pass in the reverse direction, writing another set of tracks. This procedure is repeated until all tracks have been read or written. By using the linear serpentine method, the tape medium can have many more tracks than read/write heads. Compared to simple linear recording, using the same tape length and the same number of heads, the data storage capacity is substantially higher.

 Scanning

Helical

Scanning recording methods write short dense tracks across the width of the tape medium, not along the length. Tape heads are placed on a drum or disk which rapidly rotates while the relatively slowly moving tape passes it.

An early method used to get a higher data rate than the prevailing linear method was transverse scan. In this method a spinning disk, with the tape heads embedded in the outer edge, is placed perpendicular to the path of the tape. This method is used in Ampex's DCRsi instrumentation data recorders and the old 2 inch Quadruplex videotape system. Another early method was arcuate scan. In this method, the heads are on the face of a spinning disk which is laid flat against the tape. The path of the tape heads makes an arc.

Helical scan recording writes short dense tracks in diagonal manner. This recording method is used by virtually all videotape systems and several data tape formats.

Block layout

In a typical format, data is written to tape in blocks with inter-block gaps between them, and each block is written in a single operation with the tape running continuously during the write. However, since the rate at which data is written or read to the tape drive is not deterministic, a tape drive usually has to cope with a difference between the rate at which data goes on and off the tape and the rate at which data is supplied or demanded by its host.

Various methods have been used alone and in combination to cope with this difference. The tape drive can be stopped, backed up, and restarted (known as shoe-shining, because of increased wear of both medium and head). A large memory buffer can be used to queue the data. The host can assist this process by choosing appropriate block sizes to send to the tape drive. There is a complex tradeoff between block size, the size of the data buffer in the record/playback deck, the percentage of tape lost on inter-block gaps, and read/write throughput.

Finally modern tape drives offer speed matching feature, where drive can dynamically decrease physical tape speed as much as 50% to avoid shoe-shining.

Sequential access to data

From user perspective the primary difference between tape data storage and disk data storage is that tape is a sequential access medium while disk is a random access medium. Hence tape uses a very trivial filesystem in which files are addressed by number not by filename. Metadata such as file name or modification time is typically not stored at all. Over time some tools (i.e. tar) were introduced to enable storing metadata by introducing richer formats of packing multiple files in a single large 'tape file'.

Access time

Tape has quite a long latency for random accesses since the deck must wind an average of one-third the tape length to move from one arbitrary data block to another. Most tape systems attempt to alleviate the intrinsic long latency, either using indexing, where a separate lookup table (tape directory) is maintained which gives the physical tape location for a given data block number (a must for serpentine drives), or by marking blocks with a tape mark that can be detected while winding the tape at high speed.

Data compression

Most tape drives now include some kind of data compression. There are several algorithms which provide similar results: LZ (most), IDRC (Exabyte), ALDC (IBM, QIC) and DLZ1 (DLT). Embedded in tape drive hardware, these compress a relatively small buffer of data at a time, so cannot achieve extremely high compression even of highly redundant data. A ratio of 2:1 is typical, with some vendors claiming 2.6:1 or 3:1. The ratio actually obtained with real data is often less than the stated figure; the compression ratio cannot be relied upon when specifying the capacity of equipment, e.g., a drive claiming a compressed capacity of 500GB may not be adequate to back up 500GB of real data. Software compression can achieve much better results with sparse data, but uses the host computer's processor, and can slow the backup if it is unable to compress as fast as the data is written.

Some enterprise tape drives can encrypt data (this must be done after compression, as encrypted data cannot be compressed effectively). Symmetric streaming encryption algorithms are also implemented to provide high performance.

The compression algorithms used in low-end products are not the most effective known today, and better results can usually be obtained by turning off hardware compression, using software compression (and encryption if desired) instead.


The possibility to get 35TB on one LTO cartridge

IBM researchers have demonstrated a world record in areal data density on linear magnetic tape - a significant update to one of the computer industry's most resilient, reliable and affordable data storage technologies.

ibm_29_billion_bits_per_square_inch_tape_01
The read-write machine where IBM scientists in Zurich
demonstrated a new record in magnetic tape data density


This breakthrough proves that tape technology can increase capacity for years to come, which has important implications, as tape storage systems are more energy efficient and cost-effective than hard disk drive storage systems. As the physical world becomes increasingly networked with sensors, vast amounts of data are amassed in various formats from medical images to security camera feeds to supply chain sensors to financial records. All of this data needs to be archived, replicated for disaster recovery, and/or retained or regulatory compliance.

The scientists at IBM Research - Zurich, in cooperation with the FUJIFILM Corporation of Japan, recorded data onto an advanced prototype tape, at a density of 29.5 billion bits per square inch - about 39 times the areal data density of today's most popular industry-standard magnetic tape product. (The demonstration was performed at product-level tape speeds (2 meters per second) and achieved error rates that are correctable using standard error-correction techniques to meet IBM's performance specification for its LTO Generation 4 products.) To achieve this feat, IBM Research has developed several new critical technologies, and for the past three years worked closely with FUJIFILM to optimize its next-generation dual-coat magnetic tape based on barium ferrite (BaFe) particles.

"This exciting achievement shows that tape storage is alive and strong and will continue to provide users reliable data protection, while maintaining a cost advantage over other storage technologies, including hard disk drives and flash," said Cindy Grossman, vice president, IBM Tape and Archive Storage Systems.

These new technologies are estimated to enable cartridge capacities that could hold up to 35 trillion bytes (terabytes) of uncompressed data. (This calculation assumes a roughly 12% increase in tape length due to the reduced medium thickness.) This is about 44 times (This has been rounded up from 43.75 times.) the capacity of today's IBM LTO Generation 4 cartridge. A capacity of 35 terabytes of data is sufficient to store the text of 35 million books, which would require 248 miles (399 km) of bookshelves.

"This tape storage density demonstration represents a step towards developing technologies to achieve tape areal recording densities of 100 billion bits per square inch and beyond. Such technologies will be necessary to keep up with the rapid increase in digital information. IBM is in the unique position to help clients store, maintain and analyze the wealth of data accumulating, and thus help them achieve efficiencies and advantages in the way they do business," comments Evangelos Eleftheriou, IBM Fellow.

Critical business data is often contained in automated tape libraries, where one or more tape drives service dozens to thousands of tape cartridges. High-end tape libraries can store petabytes - millions of gigabytes - of information. On a per-gigabyte basis, tape systems currently cost about one-fifth to one-tenth of a hard disk drive (HDD) storage systems, depending on the size. Also, tape is by far one of the most energy-efficient storage technologies available today.

For the past several years, scientists from IBM Research - Zurich have dramatically improved the precision of controlling the position of the read-write heads, leading to a more than 25-fold increase in the number of tracks that can be squeezed onto the half-inch-wide tape. In addition, they have developed new advanced detection methods to improve the accuracy of reading the tiny magnetic bits, thereby achieving an increase in the linear recording density of more than 50 percent. Another key enabling technology for achieving the required track-follow performance in this demonstration was a new, low-friction read-write head developed by IBM Research - Almaden, which has also been collaborating with FUJIFILM to develop next-generation media.

IBM has a long history of innovation in magnetic-tape data storage. Its first commercial tape product, the 726 Magnetic Tape Unit, was announced nearly 60 years ago. It used reels of half-inch-wide tape that each had a capacity of about 2 megabytes. The areal density demonstration announced today represents a potential increase in capacity of 17,500,000 times compared with IBM's first tape drive product. This announcement reaffirms IBM's continued commitment and leadership in magnetic tape technology.

IBM's world-record achievement leverages
notable improvements in four areas
of the magnetic tape system:


 
  1. New high-density, dual-coated particulate magnetic tape: Developed by FUJIFILM Corporation in Japan in close collaboration with IBM Research scientists, this next-generation version of its NANOCUBIC tape uses a new ultra-fine, perpendicularly-oriented barium-ferrite magnetic medium that enables high-density data recording without using expensive metal sputtering or evaporation coating methods.
  2. Advanced servo control technologies for ultra accurate head positioning: Three new servo control technologies have been developed by IBM Research - Zurich, leading to a more than 25-fold increase in the number of data tracks that can be squeezed onto the half-inch-wide tape: 1) a new servo pattern, enabling the generation of high-bandwidth nanometer-scale position information; 2) a new method for detecting and decoding the position information encoded in the servo pattern, and 3) advanced state-space-based control concepts that, combined with the other two technologies, culminated in the demonstration of an extremely precise track-follow performance of less than 24 nm standard deviation from the target track position. These technologies were instrumental in reducing the track width to less than 0.45 micrometers.
  3. Innovative signal-processing algorithms for the data channel: An advanced data read channel based on a new data-dependent noise-predictive, maximum-likelihood (DD-NPML) detection scheme was developed at IBM Research - Zurich to enable the accurate detection of the data despite the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from the use of an ultra-narrow 0.2-µm data reader head. With this technique, which also takes the noise characteristics of FUJIFILM's BaFe medium into account, a linear density increase of more than 50 percent relative to LTO Generation 4 was achieved.
  4. Low-friction GMR (giant magnetoresistive) read/write head assemblies: Two new head technologies have been developed by the tape development and research teams at IBM Research - Almaden, namely, a new reduced-friction head assembly that allows the use of smoother magnetic tapes and an advanced GMR head module incorporating optimized servo readers. These head technologies were critical for achieving the required track-follow performance mentioned above.


 

Tape Drive / Media
Compatibility Matrix

In order to protect your data and your investment in a technology, you need to fully understand the platform you work with. This media compatibility overview will help you understand the compatibility between our different drive technologies and available media.


LTO Tape Drives
Tape Format LTO-5 LTO-4 LTO-3 LTO-2 LTO-1
LTO-5 RW - - - -
LTO-4 RW RW - - -
LTO-3 R RW RW - -
LTO-2 - R RW RW -
LTO-1 - - R RW RW


DAT Tape Drives
Tape Format DAT 320 DAT 160 DAT 72 DDS-4 DDS-3
DAT 320 RW - - - -
DAT 160 RW RW - - -
DAT 72 - RW RW - -
DDS-4 - RW RW RW -
DDS-3 - - RW RW RW


VXA Tape Drives
Tape Format VXA-320 VXA-172 VXA-2 VXA-1
VXA-3 RW RW - -
VXA-2 RW RW RW -
VXA-1 - - RW RW


SLR Tape Drives
Tape Format SLR140 SLR100 SLR75 SLR60 SLR7 SLR5
SLR140 RW - - - - -
SLR100 RW RW - - - -
SLR75 RW RW RW RW - -
SLR60 RW RW RW RW - -
SLR50 RW RW RW RW - -
SLR40 RW RW RW RW - -
SLR7 R R R R RW -
SLR32 - R R R - -
SLR24 - R R R - -
SLR5 - - R R R RW
SLR4 - - R - - RW
SLR3 - - - - - RW

Legend

  • RW: read and write compatible
  • R: read-only compatible
  • dash: not compatible